Alison Ritchie

Alison Ritchie 2018-05-31T13:34:37+00:00

Alison Ritchie

I am a Research Scientist (Restoration Ecology and Conservation Genetics), examining multiple research themes within disturbed landscapes of the Southwest of Western Australia.

Research themes

  • restoration and landscape ecology
  • seed enhancement technologies
  • seed germination and emergence
  • weed ecology
  • pollination ecology and plant-pollinator interactions
  • conservation and population genetics.

I divide my time between the ERIE group at the University of Western Australia and the Kings Park Science group at the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions.

My current project aims to develop and implement innovative seed enhancement technologies to overcome barriers to native plant establishment for the ecological restoration of an international biodiversity hotpsot.

Technological advances in the agricultural industry facilitate large-scale plant establishment from seed. Currently however, there is limited capacity to deliver this technology to restore natural ecosystems at similar scales. My research aims to deliver this technology to native species by developing seed enhancements such as seed coating and extruded pelleting and implementing extensive field trials.

Collaborations

Through collaboration with industry partners from diverse backgrounds including precision environmental research (Kings Park Science), commercial suppliers of soil amendments (Bentonite Products WA), and large-scale end-users of restoration seeding technologies (Hanson Construction Materials), my current research program will not only improve seed use efficiencies but diversify and promote collaborative efforts between local industries in a rapidly growing restoration economy.

Funding received

5 year ARC Linkage Project Awarded to UWA- LP170100075 “Innovative seed technologies for restoration in a biodiversity hotspot”.

Previous research and work

2017-2018 Global Innovation Linkages Project, Kings Park Science, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions.

2015-2016 Post-doctoral researcher, Curtin University. Post-Pine Forest Restoration.

2015 PhD University of Western Australia.

2014-2015 Research Associate, University of Western Australia/Kings Park Science. Pilbara phenological studies, Restoration Seedbank Initiative.

2011-2013 Casual Education Presenter, Visitor Services, Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority.

2009 BSc Conservation Biology and Management with first class Honours, University of Western Australia.

Qualifications

2015 PhD University of Western Australia. Thesis title: Ecological and Genetic Indicators of Restoration Success.

Supervisors: Dr Siegy Krausss, Dr Paul Nevill, Dr Elizabeth Sinclair, Prof Kingsley Dixon.

2009 BSc Conservation Biology and Management with first class Honours, University of Western Australia. Thesis title: Realized mating patterns of Banksia attenuata: contrasting restored and natural populations.

Supervisors: Dr Siegy Krauss, Dr Ben Miller

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Alison’s Links:

Researcher ID
ORCID
Research Gate
Google Scholar profile
BGPA Website

Top Publications

Ritchie AL, Erickson TE, Merritt DJ (2017) Monitoring of plant phenology and seed production identifies two distinct seed collection seasons in the Australian arid zone. The Rangeland Journal, 39: 73-83.

Miller BP, Sinclair EA, Menz MHM et al. (2017) A framework for the practical science necessary to restore sustainable, resilient, and biodiverse ecosystems. Restoration Ecology, 25: 605-617.

Ritchie AL, Nevill PG, Sinclair EA, Krauss SL (2017) Does restored plant diversity play a role in the reproduction functionality of Banksia populations? Restoration Ecology, 25: 414-423.

Frick KM, Ritchie AL, Krauss SL (2014) Field of Dreams: Restitution of Pollinator Services in Restored bird-pollinated plant populations. Restoration Ecology, 22: 832-840.

Ritchie AL, Krauss SL (2012) A genetic assessment of ecological restoration success in Banksia attenuata. Restoration Ecology, 20: 441-449.

EcoCheck: Perth’s Banksia woodlands are in the path of the sprawling city. The Conversation, A Ritchie, E Sinclair, J Stevens, L Commander, R Davis, W Fowler 3 June 2016 https://theconversation.com/ecocheck-perths-banksia-woodlands-are-in-thepath-of-the-sprawling-city-59911